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Island jewels of the sea

Hidden away amid the Caribbean’s turquoise waters, the Bahamas offers a delicious cocktail of cosmopolitan city life and suburban solitude, making it the perfect destination for any intrepid traveller. From beach bums and sun worshippers, to carnival seekers, romantic honeymooners and daring divers, the Bahamas will seduce you all. Soak up the charm and allure of Nassau, dote over the famous swimming pigs at The Exumas and visit the sailing capital, The Abacos. With the taste of rum on your tongue and the soft white sand between your toes, we guarantee you’ll be mesmerised by the kaleidoscopic vibrancy of the Bahamas.

Why not combine a visit to the Bahamas with your Miami or New York trip? In a matter of hours, you could be swapping the Big Apple’s busy streets or Miami’s vibrant nightlife with the calming Bahamian seas and white sands. It’s the perfect way to extend your travels.

Learn more about our holidays

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Our Top 10 Beaches of 2016
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Our favourite time to go to Bahamas

Weather

Avg Max TempAvg Rainfall
JAN
24°C
60mm
FEB
25°C
55mm
MAR
25°C
55mm
APR
26°C
70mm
MAY
27°C
110mm
JUN
28°C
267mm
JUL
28°C
170mm
AUG
29°C
235mm
SEP
28°C
195mm
OCT
28°C
144mm
NOV
26°C
94mm
DEC
25°C
73mm
Our Favourite Time
Rainy Season
Find more about Nassau

Dry Season

The drier months of December to April see less rain, a milder climate, and a pleasant breeze thanks to the Bahamas’ proximity to North America. Being high season, there’s a great choice of things to do and a feel-good holiday atmosphere.  

Our Favourite Season

A perfect escape from the cold weather back home, our favourite time to visit the Bahamas is in the drier months of December to April, when the islands enjoy the most comfortable temperatures without being too hot. 

Rainy Season

The Bahamas’ rainy season coincides with its hottest temperatures, meaning the short, sharp showers from May to October are actually a welcome relief from the heat and humidity. The hurricane season stretches from June to November, but storms are usually detected early.  

Avg Max TempAvg Rainfall
JAN
24°C
60mm
FEB
25°C
55mm
MAR
25°C
55mm
APR
26°C
70mm
MAY
27°C
110mm
JUN
28°C
267mm
JUL
28°C
170mm
AUG
29°C
235mm
SEP
28°C
195mm
OCT
28°C
144mm
NOV
26°C
94mm
DEC
25°C
73mm
Our Favourite Time
Rainy Season
Find more about Grand Bahama

Dry Season

The drier months of December to April see less rain, a milder climate, and a pleasant breeze thanks to the Bahamas’ proximity to North America. Being high season, there’s a great choice of things to do and a feel-good holiday atmosphere.  

Our Favourite Season

A perfect escape from the cold weather back home, our favourite time to visit the Bahamas is in the drier months of December to April, when the islands enjoy the most comfortable temperatures without being too hot. 

Rainy Season

The Bahamas’ rainy season coincides with its hottest temperatures, meaning the short, sharp showers from May to October are actually a welcome relief from the heat and humidity. The hurricane season stretches from June to November, but storms are usually detected early.  

Avg Max TempAvg Rainfall
JAN
24°C
60mm
FEB
25°C
55mm
MAR
25°C
55mm
APR
26°C
70mm
MAY
27°C
110mm
JUN
28°C
267mm
JUL
28°C
170mm
AUG
29°C
235mm
SEP
28°C
195mm
OCT
28°C
144mm
NOV
26°C
94mm
DEC
25°C
73mm
Our Favourite Time
Rainy Season
Find more about The Abacos

Dry Season

The drier months of December to April see less rain, a milder climate, and a pleasant breeze thanks to the Bahamas’ proximity to North America. Being high season, there’s a great choice of things to do and a feel-good holiday atmosphere.  

Our Favourite Season

A perfect escape from the cold weather back home, our favourite time to visit the Bahamas is in the drier months of December to April, when the islands enjoy the most comfortable temperatures without being too hot. 

Rainy Season

The Bahamas’ rainy season coincides with its hottest temperatures, meaning the short, sharp showers from May to October are actually a welcome relief from the heat and humidity. The hurricane season stretches from June to November, but storms are usually detected early.  

Avg Max TempAvg Rainfall
JAN
24°C
60mm
FEB
25°C
55mm
MAR
25°C
55mm
APR
26°C
70mm
MAY
27°C
110mm
JUN
28°C
267mm
JUL
28°C
170mm
AUG
29°C
235mm
SEP
28°C
195mm
OCT
28°C
144mm
NOV
26°C
94mm
DEC
25°C
73mm
Our Favourite Time
Rainy Season
Find more about The Exumas

Dry Season

The drier months of December to April see less rain, a milder climate, and a pleasant breeze thanks to the Bahamas’ proximity to North America. Being high season, there’s a great choice of things to do and a feel-good holiday atmosphere.  

Our Favourite Season

A perfect escape from the cold weather back home, our favourite time to visit the Bahamas is in the drier months of December to April, when the islands enjoy the most comfortable temperatures without being too hot. 

Rainy Season

The Bahamas’ rainy season coincides with its hottest temperatures, meaning the short, sharp showers from May to October are actually a welcome relief from the heat and humidity. The hurricane season stretches from June to November, but storms are usually detected early.  

Avg Max TempAvg Rainfall
JAN
24°C
60mm
FEB
25°C
55mm
MAR
25°C
55mm
APR
26°C
70mm
MAY
27°C
110mm
JUN
28°C
267mm
JUL
28°C
170mm
AUG
29°C
235mm
SEP
28°C
195mm
OCT
28°C
144mm
NOV
26°C
94mm
DEC
25°C
73mm
Our Favourite Time
Rainy Season
Find more about Paradise Island

Dry Season

The drier months of December to April see less rain, a milder climate, and a pleasant breeze thanks to the Bahamas’ proximity to North America. Being high season, there’s a great choice of things to do and a feel-good holiday atmosphere.  

Our Favourite Season

A perfect escape from the cold weather back home, our favourite time to visit the Bahamas is in the drier months of December to April, when the islands enjoy the most comfortable temperatures without being too hot. 

Rainy Season

The Bahamas’ rainy season coincides with its hottest temperatures, meaning the short, sharp showers from May to October are actually a welcome relief from the heat and humidity. The hurricane season stretches from June to November, but storms are usually detected early.  

Excursions in and around Bahamas

Map Key:
Show Map Key

Flight Information

There are two main carriers offering flights to Nassau, the Bahamas’ capital, from the UK.

Direct Carriers: The direct carrier from the UK is British Airways from London Heathrow up, to five times per week.

Indirect Carriers: British Airways also offer flights from most other regional airports including Manchester, Glasgow and Edinburgh with a connection via London Heathrow. American Airlines fly from most regional UK airports going via the USA.

Visa Information

British citizens do not require a visa to travel to the Bahamas.

Currency

The official currency of the Bahamas is the Bahamian Dollar that is pegged to the US dollar keeping them equal. US dollars are also accepted across the islands. You can exchange your UK currency for Bahamian dollars before you travel and there is no restriction on foreign currency when entering the Bahamas. 

How to get your currency

People usually use the US dollar when on holiday in the Bahamas. If you don’t exchange your UK currency before you travel, you can withdraw cash from a cash machine after arrival. Cash machines offer the best exchange rates, however you will be charged a transaction fee from the bank you are using as well as from your bank at home. The major commercial banks are available throughout the larger islands and tourist areas for exchanging currency or withdrawing cash but they’re not as prevalent on more remote islands so make sure you’re prepared. Avoid exchanging cash at bureau exchanges or hotels where the transaction fees tend to be much higher. Major credit cards are widely accepted on the main islands but you may have difficulty on the more remote isles. Most establishments only accept credit cards with chip and pin.

Currency code

BSD

Tipping

Most restaurants in the Bahamas automatically add a 15% service charge to your bill so check before double tipping. It is customary to leave a bit extra if the service was good. At a bar, tip one or two dollars per drink and the same per bag for porters. For taxi drivers, round up to the nearest dollar for short trips or give a couple for longer journeys. Most people in the service industry in the Bahamas are not paid well and rely on tips for the bulk of their earnings.

Health

It is recommended that you get a Hepatitis A, Polio and Typhoid jab before you travel to the Bahamas.

What to pack

The Bahamas enjoy about 320 days of sun every year and with more beachfront than any other Caribbean nation—800 miles to be exact—your holiday is sure to involve sun, sea, and sand.

Lightweight jacket;

Converter and adapter—the Bahamas’ power supply is 120 volts at 60 hertz;

Cotton t-shirts and shorts to keep you cool;

Trousers for evening and going anywhere besides the beach;

Camera and underwater camera for snorkelling;

An umbrella or water proof jacket in the rainy season;

Snorkelling gear.

High-SPF sunscreen;

Sandals or flip flops;

Bahamas Specialities

Unsurprisingly, given the Bahamas’ location, Bahamian cuisine is heavily seafood orientated. You’ll enjoy subtle spicy flavours and unique local produce when dining in the Bahamas with Conch, a firm white meat from a large ocean mollusc, being a particular favourite with the locals. You’ll also see plenty of land crabs, crawfish and fresh fish on the menu too.

Conch Chowder
A Bahamian favourite, Conch chowder combines delicious fresh tomatoes, potatoes, sweet peppers and carrots with salt pork, thyme and the all-important conch meat. You might also see variations that include clams or tomato paste to make the broth thicker. It’s a favourite of ours too.

Souse
Souse (pronounced Sowse) is a simple Bahamian dish made of onions, lime juice, celery, peppers and any choice of meat such as chicken or oxtail.  It’s truly tasty and makes for the ideal light lunch.

Boiled Fish and Grits
A take on the American Deep South’s favourite breakfast, the Bahamians love boiled fish and grits, a type of coarsely ground corn kernels. Usually served with grouper fish, the ingredients are typically boiled with water or milk and served for a traditional island breakfast.

Rice ‘n’ Peas
Peas are a stable ingredient in the Bahamian diet and are used in many recipes but the classic rice ‘n’ peas is by far the most popular dish. Served mixed with rice, a popular method to cooking the much loved pigeon or black-eye peas is with salt pork, tomatoes, celery and green pepper with plenty of seasoning, including thyme. Locals often sprinkle hot sauce over the top to give it an extra kick.

Johnnycakes
Dating back to the days of the islands’ early settlers, Johnnycakes are a type of bread with butter, milk, flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. The ingredients are mixed together then pan fried and were hugely popular with fishermen who could easily make the dish on their boats.

Street Food

Street food plays a hugely important role in Bahamian life; it not only gives employment opportunities for the local economy but provides tourists with authentic, flavoursome cuisine during their trip. Queue with the locals at buzzing street vendors and be drawn into Bahamian street life. Just be sure to only order street food from clean stalls offering fresh food that’s cooked right in front of you.

Fresh or Fried Conch
Conch is a Bahamian favourite and can be served in a variety of ways, all of which are simply delicious. For fresh conch, the meat is scoured with a knife and mixed with lime juice and spices, often served with slices of onion and fire-hot sauce. For fried conch, locals pound the meat flat, dip in batter and deep-fry.

Conch Fritters
These tasty fritters see the conch meat mixed with finely minced sweet peppers, onions, tomato paste, flour, eggs and milk. The ingredients are then shaped into balls and fried, served with the locals’ favourite hot sauce.

Average Prices

Due to most food produce being imported, along with the addition of duty taxes and freight charges, prices in the Bahamas are relatively high. A meal for two at a mid-range restaurant will typically cost you around 75 Bahamian dollars but fast food is much cheaper. A 1.5 litre of water from a grocery store will cost around two Bahamian dollars whilst a bottle of mid-range wine will cost about 15 dollars.

National Dress

Bahamians do not have a national costume and dress in modern clothing, similar to what we might wear in the summer. You will however get to see colourful costumes at the annual Junkanoo Festival, with brightly coloured outfits lighting up the streets. The garments tend to consist of crepe paper meticulously glued to fabric, cardboard or wood to create stunning headdresses, flamboyant shoulder pieces and eye-catching skirts.

Customs & Traditions

Many of the customs and traditions in the Bahamas have been shaped by both African culture and European colonial influence. Etiquette is similar to that of the UK, most notably in terms of politeness and consideration for others. Here are some to remember:

  • Wear appropriate clothing when away from the beach; shorts and shirts are fine but save your swimwear for the beach
  • Many Bahamians are devout Christians and so Sundays are typically reserved for church and prayer
  • Bahamians drive on the left hand side of the road however most vehicles are left-hand drive due to being imported from the USA
  • You should greet people with a handshake, a smile and direct eye contact. Not maintaining direct eye contact is viewed as suspicious behaviour
  • Bahamians tend to only use first-names after knowing someone for a while so don’t rush it
  • The legal drinking age in the Bahamas is 18 years old
  • Importing, possessing or dealing unlawful drugs is a serious offence with heavy penalties in the Bahamas
  • While time is generally more relaxed in the Bahamas, it’s important to not be more than 15 minutes late if you’re invited to someone’s home. Make sure you dress as you would for going to the office; dressing too informally can be seen as disrespectful
  • Bahamians have a good sense of humour and tend to make fun of themselves as well as tease others. It should be seen as harmless and the locals like it when you join in

 

Wildlife

The Bahamas is home to a huge array of animal and wildlife species both on land and under water. The clear seas of the shallow islands means a blissful walk in the tidal pools can offer a glimpse of crabs, starfish, beautiful shells and colourful fish. There are 27 national parks in the Bahamas that protect marine and land animals, including the world’s longest underwater cave system and the largest breeding colony of West Indian flamingos.You can also visit the most successful marine fishery reserve in the Caribbean.

Bahamian Pigs
For a truly unique and memorable Bahamian experience, head to The Abacos to swim with the pigs. The legend goes that the pigs survived a shipwreck many years ago and managed to swim to shore, making their home in the tropical foliage and white sands that are now known as Pig Beach. As soon as the pigs hear boats approaching the island, they thunder over the sand and jump into the sea, ready for visitors to splash in the water with them. They’re normally on the hunt for scraps of food too. It promises to be an unforgettable trip.

Bird Watching
There’s a spectrum of tropical birds to see throughout the islands of the Bahamas, making it the perfect spot for any keen ornithologist. From the Bahama yellowthroat to the Bahama parrot and various wading birds, it’s a bird watcher’s paradise.You’ll also see Caribbean coots, egrets and herons at various national parks and reserves including the Black Sound Cay National Reserve and the Lucayan National Park.

Horseback Riding
If you fancy a spot of equestrian action, why not try horseback riding on Paradise Island, Grand Bahama Island or the Abacos? Choose from peaceful carriage rides, saddling up and traversing the silent Bahamian woods or galloping across the deserted beaches for the ultimate sense of freedom.

Scuba Diving and Snorkelling
If an underwater adventure is on your itinerary, you’ve come to the right place. With vivid, brightly coloured reefs and an abundance of stunning marine life, the Bahamas is a scuba diving and snorkelling paradise. The 760-mile arc of islands, nestled among pure white sands and crystal clear waters, offers a huge range of pools and shallows to explore whether you’re a first-time snorkeler or a PADI-enthused scuba diver. Swim alongside sharks, dolphins, sting rays, loggerhead turtles and teems of tropical fish to make unforgettable aquatic memories.

Pink Flamingos
The pink flamingos of Inagua National Park add a splash of fuchsia across Lake Windsor as the stunning birds stand tall with their black-tipped wings and crimson hues. Around 50,000 of these remarkable birds nest on the salt ponds of the island, making it a spectacular scene for those who trek to see them.